Showing posts with label Japan photography. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Japan photography. Show all posts

Yusa Studio







Japanese school girls practicing naginata (薙刀). Naginata is a pole weapon traditionally used by members of the samurai class. It consists of a wooden shaft with a curved blade on the end. In the modern martial art form of naginata, it is carved from one piece of Japanese white oak or it features a replaceable blade constructed from bamboo. Practitioners wear protective armor called bogu (防具). It is very similar to the armor worn by practitioners of kendo. In modern Japan, naginatajutsu is practiced especially by women.
This photo comes from a year album for 1935 of a girls’ school in Okayama City, Japan. The 55 photographs show the female students studying, doing traditional Japanese as well Western sports, playing games, posing, at the train station and about town. The album also includes classroom scenes, portraits of teachers as well as administrative personnel and the Showa era wooden school building itself. For more information about education in Japan during the Meiji, Taisho and early Showa periods, read Okayama 1935 

Japanese school girls in a classroom. This photo comes from a year album for 1935 of a girls’ school in Okayama City, Japan. The 55 photographs show the female students studying, doing traditional Japanese as well Western sports, playing games, posing, at the train station and about town. The album also includes classroom scenes, portraits of teachers as well as administrative personnel and the Showa era wooden school building itself. For more information about education in Japan during the Meiji, Taisho and early Showa periods, read Okayama 1935 • School Girls Eating Bento.


Japanese school girls reading books. This photo comes from a year album for 1935 of a girls’ school in Okayama City, Japan. The 55 photographs show the female students studying, doing traditional Japanese as well Western sports, playing games, posing, at the train station and about town. The album also includes classroom scenes, portraits of teachers as well as administrative personnel and the Showa era wooden school building itself. For more information about education in Japan during the Meiji, Taisho and early Showa periods, read Okayama 1935 • School Girls Eating Bento.











Japanese school girls playing table tennis. This photo comes from a year album for 1935 of a girls’ school in Okayama City, Japan. The 55 photographs show the female students studying, doing traditional Japanese as well Western sports, playing games, posing, at the train station and about town. The album also includes classroom scenes, portraits of teachers as well as administrative personnel and the Showa era wooden school building itself. For more information about education in Japan during the Meiji, Taisho and early Showa periods, read Okayama 1935 • School Girls Eating Bento.


Japanese school girls playing Toryanse. In this game, girls would stand behind each other with the one in front spreading her arms to prevent a loose standing girl from joining the line. The popular traditional song by the same name was sung. This song celebrated Tenmangu shrines, which are dedicated to knowledge and learning.It appears there were several versions of this song. One source was able to give me the following words as she remembered them from her childhood:



Toryanse, toryanse
Koko wa doko no hosomichi ja?
Tenjinsama no hosomichi ja
Chitto toshite kudashanse
Goyo no nai mono toshasenu
Kono ko no nanatsu no oiwai ni
O-fuda o osame ni mairimasu
Iki wa yoi yoi, kaeri wa kowai
Kowainagara mo
Toryanse, toryanse

Toryanse, toryanse
Koko wa neifu no hosomichi ja
Kijinsama no hosomichi ja
Chitto toshite kudashanse
Nie no nai mono tōshasenu
Kono ko no nanatsu no tomurai ni
Kuyo wo tanomi ni mairimasu
Iki wa yoi yoi, kaeri wa kowai
Kowainagara mo
Toryanse, toryanse
In olden days, many children didn’t survive their early years, so making it beyond three, five or seven years of age was seen as a moment to celebrate and make offerings at a temple or shrine. This is the origin of the Shichi-Go-San ceremony still observed today. The song is a conversation between a mother with her seven year old child and guards at a check post:
Let me pass, let me pass
What is this narrow pathway here?
It’s the narrow pathway of the Tenjin shrine
Please allow me to pass through
Those without good reason shall not pass
To celebrate this child’s 7th birthday
I’ve come to dedicate my offering
Going in may be fine, fine, but returning would be scary
It’s scary but
Let me pass, let me pass
Let me pass, let me pass
Here is the underworld’s narrow pathway
It’s the narrow pathway of the demon’s shrine
Please allow me to pass through
Those without sacrifice shall not pass
To bury this child at age 7
I’ve come to offer my services
Living may be fine, fine, but going back would be scary
It’s scary but
Let me pass, let me pass1
The melody of this song can often be heard at Japanese pedestrian crossings, where it is used to let blind people know that the light is green and they can cross the street:

Rinko Kawauchi
















In her native Japan the 34-year-old Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi has become one of the most celebrated photographers of her generation. After appearing in several museum exhibitions and festivals in Europe (among others "Rencontres de la Photographie", Arles; Fondation Cartier, Paris; Huis Marseille, Amsterdam: Photographers' Gallery, London)

Sayaka Maruyama



Sayaka Maruyama, 1983, Japan, is an artist that uses various techniques in her artwork. She draws, paints, designs and edits films, but most of all she photographs. She often works together with hair and head prop artist Tomihiro Kono, also in the series Japan Avant Garde, which is based on her feelings as a Japanese living abroad. The images of Sayaka are often dark, mysterious but do sometimes contain bizarre colours. The following images come from the series Japan Avant Garde, Tori-Onna and Silent Conversation.















http://www.syk-jp.com/

Mikiko Hara