Showing posts with label Italy photography. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Italy photography. Show all posts

Stefano De Luigi


For More Information >>http://www.stefanodeluigi.com/


Among the finalists in the category World Press Photo of the multimedia – the most prestigious photojournalism contest in the world – there is an Italian. The list of competitors in the final was published yesterday: six productions, including even “
Blanco. Visions of Blindness“by Stefano De Luigi.  Read the personal page dedicated to the project to RVM.

                               





Tele-Visioni is a project which deals with the television world and looks at some of the behavioural archetypes portrayed in its programs. I have spent over 15 years researching this media format and looking at the social responsibilities it has towards our society. I have spent over 15 years fighting this endless battle in which television keeps on rising up above me like a Phoenix, stronger and more alive than ever.



The project is now in a new phase which involves digital manipulation techniques. The images on the screens are in fact photographs that I took previously in TV studios and later positioned onto the screens of the homes I had photographed in order to better interact and create the contrast I was looking for. New phases of this project are planned in USA, Brazil and Japan.

Federico Patellani

anna magnani
 Anna Magnani was an Italian stage and film actress.
In the realm of Italian cinema, she was "passionate, fearless, and exciting," an actress that film historian Barry Monush calls "the volcanic earth mother of all Italian cinema." she  is  my fav  actress :)

maria callas

anna magnani

Felice Beato


Felice Beato (1832 – 29 January 1909), was an Italian–British photographer. He was one of the first photographers to take pictures in East Asia and one of the first war photographers. He is noted for his genre works, portraits, and views and panoramas of the architecture and landscapes of Asia and the Mediterranean region.




What really drew me to his work was the subtlety of colour – natural and sepia shades faded with barely there dusty pastels, with some very prominent primary colours. I think it’s absolutely beautiful and I think it’s looking closer to what I hope my colour pallette will be.

Paolo Pellegrin